A look back at Laurel history - 1/18/18

Marvin Carter receives 1968 Distinguished Service Award from Jaycees
By: 
KATHLEEN GILLULY
Outlook managing editor
We’ve come a long way since 1918 when “the wife can be of immense help to her husband,” by opening a savings account at The Citizens National Bank.
Can anyone imagine harvesting ice? The Laurel Trading Co. had all tools necessary in 1918 to get the job done properly.s

25 years ago

Jan. 6, 1993

Minors in Laurel will no longer be able to buy or sell tobacco products with the passage of new city ordinances. The new ordinances also provide that stores are required to place signs alerting patrons that no one under 18 is allowed to purchase tobacco products. In addition, they prohibit tobacco sampling in public places.

Births were announced for Ronald Paul Bray and Sara Marie Metcalf.

Driving home her point with a hammer earned a Laurel woman a criminal mischief charge Monday when the victim produced the hammer—still stuck in his Blazer’s windshield. Laurel police reported that the victim drove his Blazer to the Laurel police station Monday around 9 a.m. to file a complaint against Cindy Britton, 47, for allegedly striking his windshield several times with a hammer. Officer Bryan Fischer said the incident appeared to be the result of an argument at a home on the 400 block of West Ave. He said shortly after the victim reported the incident to police, Britton arrived at the station and admitted to damaging the victim’s vehicle. Britton was arrested for criminal mischief, given a notice to appear before Laurel Judge Larry Herman, and released.

A bell in Montana will toll the Presidential inauguration. A Crow Agency elementary school bell, donated to a restored church on the Big Horn County Historical Museum grounds in Hardin is the official Montana bell designated to ring as one of the “Bells for Hope,” heralding the inauguration. “Bells for Hope” is a national inaugural kickoff event staged by President-elect Bill Clinton’s transition team to launch the first day of inaugural activities. From coast to coast and above the earth at churches, colleges, public sites and even the space shuttle, Americans will join to peal bells at the same time.

 

50 years ago

Jan. 24. 1968

Though residents of the huge metropolitan areas tend to see the world’s affairs revolving around them, people in the remote areas, such as Montana, also are concerned with the course of world events. Noting that Red China and France are unwilling to agree to test bans on nuclear weapons, Sam Tinnes, of Laurel’s water department, has come up with a suggestion that he thinks might make them literally see the light. Tinnes has proposed the United States explode a very large nuclear warhead in space. If this were done in the dark of the moon and in a suitable position, he explains, the Red Chinese might find it throws and entirely new light on the matter of nuclear testing and development.

Six persons were honored when they received special awards presented at he annual Jaycee Distinguished Service Award Banquet. C.A. Cromwell, Sr., was named boss of the year; Jaycee Marvin Carter received the Distinguished Service Award; Bruce A. Fowler, guidance counselor at the junior high school was named Outstanding Young Educator; Robert Fox, who farms southwest of Laurel, received the Outstanding Young Farmer award; Clinton Anderson, Laurel police officer, was presented the Community Service Award; and Harold Gratwohl received the Don Hodges Youth Award. A presidential award was presented to Jaycees Bob Byrne and Don Lenhardt.

As soon as weather permits city crews will begin work on a street widening project on the 400 block of East Maryland Ln. The necessary amount of land for the project was donated by Dee Sherrow.

At the Jan. 12 meeting of the Brotherhood of Railway Carmen of America, Laurel Lodge No. 476, members officially went on record as opposing the withdrawal of Northern Pacific Trains No. 1 and 2 from service. The announcement was made last week by the union’s recording secretary, Wilbur Kirsch.

 

75 years ago

Jan. 20, 1943

An order by the Farmers Union Central Exchange, Inc., to buy the real property and assets of the Independent Refining company, including the refinery at Laurel, was considered Friday at the a meeting of the Independent Refining company’s stockholders. No decision has been announced. The proposed purchase price is $750,000, plus the cost of all raw materials and supplies. Inclusion of the latter as shown by a March 1 inventory would make the total consideration approximately $1,000,000. Announcement of the special meeting and the prospective purchaser’s offer was announced last week in Billings by Donald E. Hageman, vice president and general manager of the Independent Refining company. If the sale is consummated the Farmers Union Central Exchange, a cooperative association organized in Minnesota, will take over the properties on March 1. The Independent uses the trade name “Laurel leaf” for its products. The property involved includes the refinery here and all service stations and bulk plants of the Independent in Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. In the past the Farmers Union has been the principal customer of the refining company, Hageman said. 

A surprise housewarming party honored Mr. and Mrs. Philip Marsh at their new home, 303 Fourth Ave. Bridge was followed by a no-host supper. Gifts were presented to the honored guests. Those participating in the event were Mr. and Mrs. Harold Richardson, Mrs. and Mrs. Marshall Huntington, Mr. and Mrs. J.M. Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Barr, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Williams and Mr. and Mrs. Marsh. Mrs. Marsh won the high score bridge award for the women and Mr. Huntington the men’s award.

Mrs. Clyde Bray reports receiving a cablegram from her brother, Sergeant Forrest Lyons, and later a letter from him “somewhere in Australia.” He said in the letter that it might be some time before he could communicate with them again. Word has also been received from Sergeant Roy Horning who is also in the South Pacific.

James L. Baker, recently sold his property in the Trace tracts west of Laurel to Joseph Fiedler and has moved to 209 East Fifth, which he purchased from W.G. McKay.

 

100 years ago

Jan. 16, 1918

Pupils neither tardy nor absent from school in the Trewin District during the past month are: Dale, Dane and Ruth Vannice, Edwin Sieverbson and Jessie Wilson. New pupils enrolled: Katie Minch, and Mollie and Minnie For.

It is rumored that F.G. Stoltz has taken a partner, Henry Schessler of Laurel, into his store. Mr. Schessler was a resident of Park City for a number of years. He moved to Laurel about a year ago and since that time has been engaged in the mercantile business.

Park City Postmaster R.M. Fry is able to attend to his duties at the office again. Mr. Fry was confined at his home with illness for over a month and his friends are glad to see him able to be out again.

J.R. Rutter is recovering from a case of smallpox. His case was one of the most severe that has ever been reported here. His wife, who returned recently from Wisconsin, suffered a slight attack and it was not known what caused her illness until Mr. Rutter broke out.

Miller & Kenyon closed a deal last week for furnishing 500 tons of alfalfa hay to the U.S. government. The hay is to be delivered to Fort Keogh, near Miles City. The price received is $24 per ton delivered. This hay is on the Chapman bench southwest of Laurel and was purchased by Messrs. Miller & Kenyon for their cattle. They disposed of a part of the cattle and the mild winter gave them a surplus. The hay is of an exceptionally good quality.

C.D. Camp, who left last week with a shipment of cattle for the Chicago market, arrived in the stock yards the day the blizzard was raging. They had sheds for the catle so that they were cared for in the best possible manner. No sales were made that day so they had to hold over for the Monday market. Miller & Kenyon and L.A. Nutting also had cattle that went along with those belonging to Mr. Camp. All told there were five cars of them.

Chas. P. Linger has returned from Indiana where he visited at his old home at Nappanee. He accompanied a shipment of cattle to the Chicago market. In relating his experience on the trip he was profoundly impressed that we were at war. He stated that he shipped out of Montana on Tuesday, which was a meatless day. The next day in North Dakota it was a meatless day and the same condition was found on reaching Minnesota. He got into Chicago to find they had a meatless day on there. After he reached Indiana he was almost starved for meat and he was informed that it was a meatless day, but he passed up the hotel and went to the home of an old friend, where he got his first meat on the trip. He says the grub is not any too good at the sidings where he had to stop with the cattle when meat is served and when that ration was cut out there was not much left to satisfy the appetite of the hungry traveler.

Category:

Upcoming Events

Wednesday, June 26, 2019
10 a.m., Laurel Public Library, 720 West Third Street, Laurel, 628-4961
Wednesday, June 26, 2019
Every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., check www.laurelexchangeclub.org for more info. Find them on Facebook www.facebook.com/laurelexchangeclub . Email them to find out meeting time and to join: clubinfo@laurelexchangeclub.org The club will have a meeting or volunteer activity. Meeting location is Sid's East Side Bar & Grill on first and third Wednesdays of each month. Members and guests eat free.  Volunteer activity on the second Wednesday of each month. Check their facebook page for updates.  Every fourth Wednesday is for a club social activity. 
Tuesday, July 2, 2019
Tuesdays, Noon, Beartooth Grill, 305 1st Ave. S.
Wednesday, July 3, 2019
10 a.m., Laurel Public Library, 720 West Third Street, Laurel, 628-4961
Wednesday, July 3, 2019
Every Wednesday at 5:30 p.m., check www.laurelexchangeclub.org for more info. Find them on Facebook www.facebook.com/laurelexchangeclub . Email them to find out meeting time and to join: clubinfo@laurelexchangeclub.org The club will have a meeting or volunteer activity. Meeting location is Sid's East Side Bar & Grill on first and third Wednesdays of each month. Members and guests eat free.  Volunteer activity on the second Wednesday of each month. Check their facebook page for updates.  Every fourth Wednesday is for a club social activity. 
Monday, July 8, 2019
• Christmas to Remember meeting, second Monday, 1 p.m., at Reese & Ray’s IGA, call 248-8557 for information

The Laurel Outlook

 

Click Here to Check Out Our Latest Ads

We use Google cookies to determine our demographic of visitors to our site. You can opt out here.

We also use Twitter Analytics to track clicks from our twitter feed. 

You can find all the City Council documents that we have received here.